Helping Your Kids Reduce Anxiety During Covid 19 Situation

Helping Your Kids Reduce Anxiety During the Covid 19 Situation

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We are currently living in a time that is unsettling. We do not know what tomorrow will look like, if we will have jobs, if we can pay bills, if school will finish this year, etc. I am beginning to notice a change in our kids as well with their anxiety raising.

Many kids are enjoying this long break from school. I predict in a few weeks they will all be bored after being stuck home, not going anywhere, and not spending time with friends. I also am anticipating many kids having high anxiety as parents and caregivers begin to experience financial strain, job loss, changes in jobs, etc.

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So what can you do as a parent or caregiver to support you kids?

  • Check in with them daily to see what they are thinking and feeling.
  • Remind your kids this situation is a grown-up problem, and they should just focus on them being a kid, doing their expectations, and enjoying a break from school.
  • Share with your kids any changes that are going to happen, including you working from home, the loss of a job, changes in finances, etc. Do not do this to raise their anxiety, but rather remind them you as the grown up have decisions to make to continue to support the family.
  • Explain to your kids the expectations each day that they have, i.e. chores, schoolwork, etc. Keep them structured with fun free time built in!
  • Be open and honest with them (but keep it age appropriate) about the global situation with Covid 19. Use this as an opportunity to teach them about global response, economy, health issues, sanitation of home and work area, etc.
  • If your child has a lot of anxiety, deal with it! Please do not let it go untreated. Again, support your child with their emotions, validate how they are feeling, remind them grown-ups are dealing with this situation, remind them they are safe at home, and if needed, seek out medical support with counseling and/or medication.
  • Many therapists and doctors are now offering temporary telehealth sessions for therapy and medical appointments. Reach out to those professionals for more support for your child.
  • Likely you as a parent or caregiver have high anxiety right now too, be careful to not show this to your kids. Keep this between you and other grown-ups in your life. Kids can often pick up on the anxiety from adults; show them your happiness, happy thoughts, etc!

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Hang in there! This is a crazy time but positive can come out of this situation. Enjoy the extra time you have with your family right now and teach them the board games we played growing up that they have never experienced! Find fun things at home to do, take time to do self-care, and most of all, just laugh and be silly with your kids!

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Jen Edwards, LMHC

Owner and Director of Beautiful Autism

Autism: Changing the Parenting Style

Autism: Changing the Parenting Style

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People often ask me what it is like to parent a child with Autism. I usually respond with something along the lines of I think I am more tired, more aware, and it is just different. They ask how it is different, but I usually cannot find the exact words to describe it. It is just different.

The rules of our home are different. If our son has a bad day at school, he usually does not get privileges taken away. If we had the “normal” rule and took privileges away, he would likely never have any privileges.

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We mold our son and constantly work on flexibility. This is something we were trained on by his therapists at Rocky Mountain Autism Center in Denver, CO. Specifically his level of flexibility with objects, activity, and people. As parents, we teach and train our children to do things; they learn the task and move forward. But we tell them how to do it, we instruct them, show them, and then they practice it and master it. For example, washing our hands. We teach this skill at home when they are young. Then our children can do it anywhere there is a sink and soap.

However, with many children that have Autism, this is not the case. We teach them at home- they only will wash their hands at home because that is how they were taught. We create the problem for them; in essence, we as parents have basically set up the situation and now they attribute washing hands at home in that bathroom with that soap.

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So how is our parenting style different? We teach our child to wash his hands in many different sinks. (Yes, this is an analogy) We drive a different way home somedays. We eat at the restaurant he does not like to eat at (when we are done, then he can get a happy meal somewhere). We do not reason with him, as this gives him authority which allows for him to control the situation (we give an inch, he takes a mile idea). And yes, when he is screaming and angry, we let him get it out, as reasoning with him using words only makes it worse.

Am I exhausted? Yes. You better believe when he is asleep, I am asleep. But ultimately we need to do what is best for him. We cannot let him stay in his bubble and become rigid and set in his ways. We cannot adhere to the typical American way of parenting, otherwise our son cannot be successful.

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Sometimes people will not understand; they cannot understand what they do not live and experience. We can explain and model, but it is not our job to make them see things our way. We use our support from friends and loved ones. We stay focused on what really matters, our son. We change what needs to be changed when it needs changing. It truly is a never ending job!

We were not called to be his parents because we were trained already; but we are becoming trained as we go because we were called to be his parents. And such a blessing it is and will forever be!

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Jen Edwards, LMHCA

Counselor and Behavior Therapist

Jen@BeautifulAutism.com

Autism: Going to Bed Alone

Autism: Going to Bed Alone

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I recently heard somewhere at a training I went to that nearly 80% of individuals with Autism struggle with sleep in some capacity. I feel the parents of my client’s pain when the walk into my office looking like they only got a few hours of sleep the night before, as likely I also only got that much in my home! One common complaint I often hear is the child will not sleep in his/her own bed. I smile and nod, knowing all too well how the scenario looks each evening.

It is 8:00, the hour you dread because you know the fight is coming, and yet your body aches and screams for it because it is exhausted and needs sleep. You get your child ready for bed… teeth are brushed, pajamas are on, story is read. Then the whining and crying begins, all because they do not want to be alone, or they cannot go to sleep without touching some other person. At 11:00 you and the child are still awake, it feels like a nightmare, and you finally give in and just snuggle up to your child for some attempt at a few good hours of sleep, only to be kicked throughout the night and woken at 5:00 to the happy smile of your child ready for the bright day ahead.

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Yep, this is our story too. There are some nights that are successful for our son to go to bed alone. But this is a battle that even at 8 years old we still have to fight. Here are some thoughts we have learned over the years and some that clients have tried with success!

  • Ask your child’s doctor about using something to help your child fall asleep, such as Melatonin. This is a simple, inexpensive over the counter natural product you can find at any pharmacy.
  • Sleep with the bedroom doors open throughout the house until your child relaxes enough to sleep through the night.
  • Try creating a “brave shelf” in the bedroom. Put things on it that help give confidence to your child, such as superheroes, awards, treats, favorite toys, pictures, etc.
  • Let your child have toys, blankets, books, or anything else to help keep him/her in bed. If he/she ends up playing for a while, consider this better to the alternative! If you need to put the child to bed earlier because of the playing, then do so.Are-your-kids-going-to-bed-too-late
  • Practice going to bed throughout the day. Use a social story, pictures, etc. to help the child understand what is going to happen.
  • If your child is currently sleeping in your bed, take baby steps back to his/her bed. It might look something like sleeping on the floor for a few nights, then moving into the hallway, then further down the hallway, and finally into the bedroom.
  • If your child is struggling because he/she needs to touch someone, try having him/her sleep in a small sleeping bag under a quilt. This will give the impression of feeling secure.
  • Give rewards for any accomplishment, but be careful to not overdo the awards. For example, if your child sleeps all night in the bedroom alone, give a reward such as a treat or an extra privilege. But then the expectation is now set higher, so to earn another reward he/she might need to sleep a whole week alone.
  • Find appropriate times to work on this skill. Working on this when school begins might not be the best option. Working on it during the summer or school break is a better option.
  • Try having a pet sleep with him/her.pet
  • Have your child sleep with a weighted blanket; this has proven very successful. In the summer months, use a fan to help with staying cool.
  • Some families have had success with having white noise in the room. This can be a fan, noise machines (you can find these reasonably priced on Amazon), or music.

Going to bed alone is tough on little guys, especially with Autism. But I encourage you to fight the battle and stay strong. Find the supports you need and pounce on any encouragement you find!

Jen Edwards, LMHCA

jen@BeautifulAutism.com

425-387-3872

When to Tell Your Child He/She has Autism

When to Tell Your Child He/She has Autism

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We all have times in our lives when we face the decision of when to tell our children important or challenging things. We dread those discussions at times. The stress of it can eat at us and drain our energy. As parents we might argue about when to talk to our children about these things, causing stress on our marriage. These conversations range from talking to your child about sex to talking to your child about a diagnosis he/she has.

Our son was three years old when he was diagnosed with Autism, so obviously we were not in a huge hurry to explain to him about the diagnosis of Autism that he had. However as the years crept on, we realized at some point we were going to need to explain this to him, especially once he began realizing things about himself he did not perceive as normal. My husband and I began having conversations around when and how to tell him, as well as how do we explain it to him in a way that he can explain it to his peers to help them understand him. At first when we began discussing it the conversations did not seem that difficult, but as we got more into the details of it, the conversations got more intense and stressful.

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Eventually we got to the point where we thought our son was ready and we began to slowly introduce to him Autism. We did not tell him right away he had Autism, we wanted to see if he could begin to connect the dots himself. In time he began to, and though he is still figuring out what exactly Autism is, as well as ADHD, he is beginning to understand himself, how he interacts with others, how he is perceived by others, and he needs to function to work in the world.

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Here are some thoughts to consider when thinking about this:

  • Is my child mature enough to begin to understand the concepts of the diagnosis?
  • In what ways will this help and hinder my child?
  • Will this be able to help others in our family or others that interact with my child?
  • Who will tell my child about the diagnosis?
  • How will we tell my child about the diagnosis?
  • Am I putting my child’s needs first when thinking about this decision? Or am I allowing my own thoughts to come first?

I hear a lot of people come up with some reasonable arguments for not telling their child about the diagnosis. Some people are scared about what their child might say or how they might react. Some are afraid it will put a label on their child and others are afraid their child will use it as an excuse for poor behavior.

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Keep in mind eventually your child will likely find out about their diagnosis from someone, someway. When we want our kids to always be open and honest with us, we have to also consider that we need to demonstrate how to do this. True we need to take into a lot of considerations, just as the questions above can be used as a guideline for this, but children want the same courtesy given to them as we want from them.

When getting ready to talk to your child about the diagnosis, be sure both parents are on the same page and timing for the talk. Also, begin with just having simple conversations about what Autism is; do not begin with the bomb of, “You have Autism.” Allow your child to try and realize, through your help, they have Autism.

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Remember, these decisions take time and lots of thought. Find others that support you to help you through it. This might be your parents, therapists, doctors, or close friends. Until that time does come, enjoy your child for who he/she is and blessings come with that. Love your child, treasure the memories, enjoy the moments.

Jen Edwards

www.beautifulautism.com

jen@beautifulautism.com

Autism: I Just Want a Normal Child

Autism: I just want a normal kid!

Parents of Children with Autism Stages of Grief
I hear this so often in my line of work, “I just want a normal kid!” In a way it breaks my heart; but then again I get it. I can relate and have even said those words in my head hundreds of times. I just want a normal kid…
A saying I often tell parents, and something that finally resonated with me and truthfully allowed me to look at it from a whole new way was God does not call the qualified, He qualifies the called. Oh how that took so long to fully sink in and surrender to. And how I still at times find myself falling down and saying that “normal” word.
I find myself wanting “normal” when I am stressed and frustrated at my child; when I think he is not acting as he should be acting. I find myself feeling embarrassed at his actions or frustrated that I cannot control the overall situation. But then when I sit back and think about it, I realize I am acting rather selfishly, as I am only considering my own thoughts and feelings. My son is who he is, and I need to be thankful for that and work to meet his needs while still keeping him accountable to the given expectations that life holds.

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There are times I grieve for my son and his diagnosis of Autism. I want him to be able to experience all that life holds and the many treasures that life experiences can allow for. However I also realize that he gets the pleasure of experiencing things that I cannot because of his diagnosis. He has an amazing mind and imagination that I am not able to understanding and comprehend; he will say to me how sad it is that I cannot think like him. We are all blessed with our own gifts in life; he has his and I have mine.

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What can parents do who feel like they just want a normal child?
1) Find the “normal” within your child and LOVE that normal! That is who your child is, be in love with that and treasure each waking moment while you can.
2) Pray and ask God for wisdom and strength to love your child for who they are. As parents we all have dreams about how our children will be. We want our boys to be football players and our girls to be a princess. When our dreams are shattered by an Autism diagnosis (or any other diagnosis), we are devastated. Ask God to help you understand and be changed for the new normal.
3) Find others who can help you and encourage you daily. These might be prayer partners, family members, friends, etc. It is ok to share your thoughts and feelings to those around you who will listen to you!
4) Tell your child that you love them. If you are able to hug and kiss them, do it. If not, blow them a kiss or do it while they are sleeping.
Again, be encouraged by your child, not discouraged. And if you are feeling discouraged, find help. Having a child with special needs is a lot to deal with on a daily basis. It never hurts to seek out professional help with a therapist or ask your doctor for some advice. Most importantly, qualify yourself to be the best you can be for your child!

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Jen Edwards, MA LMHCA

jen@beautifulautism.com

http://www.beautifulautism.com

Autism: Tis the Season for Troubling Beahvior

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Autism: Tis the Season for Troubling Behavior
The odds were totally against my son yesterday morning when he had that awful, no good, very bad day. Between us rearranging bedrooms, his stuffy nose, waking up at 3:30 in the morning, and then to top it off the house is in disarray due to decorating for Christmas. It was a tough day that ended with all feeling exhausted and not very festive for the time of year.
This time of the year is often rough on children with Autism. We suddenly change the look of our homes and rearrange things and then we get extra busy with our schedules. And to top it off, we eat different things that we do not normally eat. There are a lot of changes in a short amount of time, and just as suddenly as it came, it goes away.

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Here are some tips to help your child during this time of the year:
1) Give your child warning before putting up decorations; the best is a few days before. If your child struggles with verbal communication, consider taking a picture after you decorate so next year you can show your child the picture to help him/her prepare.
2) Let your child help with the decorations. You may even consider putting a few decorations in his/her bedroom. (Be careful to not overdue it).

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3) It might be helpful to decorate in stages to help your child slowly adjust. Maybe one day you decorate the tree, then another day lights, etc.

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4) Keep your house as neat and tidy as you can while putting up the decorations. Extra boxes and messes around the house can add frustration to your child.
5) When you get ready to take down the decorations, give your child plenty of warning, and consider taking them down slowly.

Above all, be sensitive to your child’s needs. Just remember there is a lot to process this time of the year for your child, just like there is for you. Communicate with your child about his/her feelings and emotions during this time of the year. If your child appears distracted or upset about the decorations, consider finding a quiet spot for your child that is left alone from decorations to give your child a spot to go to that is “safe” from disruption.

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Enjoy your holidays and treasure this special time with your family!

Jen Edwards, MA LMHCA
jen@beautifulautism.com
http://www.beautifulautism.com

Using Autism to be a Blessing to Others

Using Autism to be a Blessing to Others

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Yesterday I read an article that was about accepting people with a disability and it got me thinking about things. Personally I have always been able to accept my son’s diagnosis of Autism, though at times I struggle with the grief of it. But I have always wanted to use my son’s disability to bless others. Is this why my son has Autism, so that through it we can bless others and show how good can come from it? I believe so, and I believe that he is learning how to bless others as well through his Autism. Maybe it does not make sense to you. Maybe it gets you thinking about things. But for us, this is our calling and gift.

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I am not going to sit here and make you believe that I always hold this optimist point of view. Even yesterday morning as my son was having a rough morning and refused to go to school I was near tears as I literally dragged him from the car into the school. Afterwards as I left the building with him screaming and calling for me, I could feel my body tense and my blood pressure elevated. My arms hurt from holding his 85 pound body and my heart ached to just sit and hold him while watching some funny movie. I wanted to scream and curse at the Autism behaviors; it needed to go away and I wanted a “normal” child.
But really that was not fair of me. My son is who he is and I love him for it. He has the diagnosis of Autism and I cannot let that define him. We have good days and bad days; it is what it is.

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How can I be a blessing to others? I remember one evening we had some friends over to dinner. They are good friends of ours now, but they asked us a lot of questions about our son and about Autism in general. We were, and are always, very open to answering any questions. After they left I remember feeling numb with “Autism talk”. But later on they expressed how informative the evening had been for them and how they felt more informed about Autism. I had blessed them by telling them truths about Autism and about our son.
How else can we bless people about Autism? Teach others about Autism, be comfortable around others, allow others to spend time with individuals with Autism, and speak positively about Autism. But I challenge you to be real with others about Autism, share the challenges along with the good things. And yes, there are good things!

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I fully believe everything works for a reason and purpose. I may not have known what I was doing when my son was initially diagnosed with Autism, but I am becoming more equipped each and every day. So for now we deal with my son’s issues as they come and in the meantime we use it all as a blessing to others in any way we can.
Jen Edwards, MA LMHCA
jen@beautifulautism.com
http://www.beautifulautism.com

Young Adults with Autism

Young Adults with Autism

                The experience of young adulthood is challenging enough without the aspect of Autism thrown on top of it.  Think about it, so much of young adulthood is the social aspect and the experience of getting a job and living independently.  These are not generally strengths of individuals with Autism.

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                They want so much to fit in and be on their own.  Their logical side can come up with the logistics of it- the budget, the plans, etc.  But it is such a challenge for them.  My heart aches for them, as they have these high ambitions with hesitancy and anxiety.  As parents, how can we help our children through this?

Social Skills in Young Adulthood

                Here is the scenario I often see: we push our kids with Autism to get involved socially in high school.  They are going to therapy and social skills classes.  They have assistants in their classes.  Parents follow up with teachers and staff at the schools constantly.  Parents help them through everything.  Then high school ends.  They are expected to possibly attend college and move forward with being an adult.  But they have had so much assistance throughout their childhood that they really do not have the maturity and knowledge to know figure it out.  We have held their hand through these social situations, and now they must do it on their own.

                Individuals with Autism can be very successful in college academically, but socially they struggle.  Many parents would say this is a curse in disguise, as generally they will not be attending the frat parties and get involved with illegal things.  But they begin to realize they do not fit in and anxiety and depression begins to rear its ugly head.

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                Then they begin applying for jobs.  But socially they tend to not know how to interview well.  They may be qualified for the job, but socially they cannot handle it.  Finding a job that does not require a lot of social skills can be difficult.

                Practice interview skills with your young adult.  Give them tips and ideas.  Help them find a job you know they can be successful at.  Use therapists to help with these skills and ideas as well.

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                Another idea is try to keep them involved in some type of social atmosphere.  For example, church groups or groups such as gaming groups might be a good fit.  Use their hobbies as ideas to find groups for them to connect with.  Basically, find a social group that they will likely stay with and enjoy.  I would also encourage the social skills groups, but those can be very therapy based- find something else also that is more natural and enjoyable.

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                There is also the aspect of romantic relationships, which honestly is a whole other post for another day!

Beginning College

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                In our culture today, we put so much success on going to college.  But honestly, people can be successful without college too, especially if it is a struggle for them.  Now do not get me wrong, I think college is great, but it is not for everyone.  If your child is struggling too much with it, do not push them.  Find alternatives such as online college or simply not going for now and focusing on job skills.

                This is the time in their life when you need to step back more and see what he/she is capable of doing.  It is hard for us as parents because we have done so much for them already, but they need the independence skills before they can go out on their own.

                First, find out what their ambitions are.  Have them write it out and make goals.  Have them also have backup plans if their first ambitions do not work out.  Then encourage them through their goals and support in ways you can without micromanaging.

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Moving out and Becoming Independent

                This is a scary step for any parent- watching their child becoming independent enough to move out on their own and support themselves.  With Autism this can be horrifying!  Can they handle the stress and concepts?  Can they pay bills and balance a checkbook?  Will they be able to socially adjust appropriately?  YIKES!

                Again, encourage your son or daughter and help them without micromanaging the situation.  Have them write out their goals and plans.  Take them through the basic steps and allow them to show you they can handle it.

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                But most of all, allow them to make their mistakes.  HARSH I know.  When the mistakes are made, help them clean it up and move forward.  And yes, this may mean moving back in, but now they understand what they need to do and have in order to gain the independence back again.  This section is honestly another post entirely.  But hopefully these thoughts and ideas can help prepare you for the beginning steps.

What to Plan for

                Start thinking now how this will look for your family and your child.  Start preparing them early while they are in high school for the challenges of life after school in adulthood.  Let them help with your billing and budget so they understand the processes behind the independence.  Encourage them to get involved in the social groups and hobbies.

                Being prepared and ahead of the situation is always best, especially with Autism.  Have plans and back up plans prepared.  Try not to push too much, but give them gentle pushes when needed.  And use a therapist to help through these transitions and ideas.  Often they will not listen to you because you are mom and dad.  Allow the therapist to push reality into them, and you encourage them and be their cheerleader.

                These are all things I work with on my young adult clients.  If you need help or ideas, contact me.

                Help your child be as successful as they can be!  Love them, encourage them, strengthen them.  Prepare yourself for being the parent, but also being their support and friend now that they are independent.  Good luck! 🙂

Contact Information

Jen Edwards

720-258-6392

jen@voyagescounseling.com

Ideas for Communication during Autism Meltdowns

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Ideas for Communication during Autism Meltdowns

                One of the most difficult aspects of Autism is the meltdowns.  Especially if they are in public places!  The looks from people and the muttering under their breath never seems to help neither the situation nor your confidence.

                Last Sunday I was at church with my son and he was beginning to go into meltdown mode.  He could not tell me what was wrong and just wanted to draw on the chalkboard.  I was so frustrated because he would not communicate to me what he was feeling or what had happened.  So I finally gave up and let him go to the chalkboard and draw.  Boy was I surprised what came from the drawing!

Drawing a Picture of the Situation

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                My son began to draw on the chalkboard a picture of what had happened.  While he was drawing, he was describing to me his emotions and the emotions of others around him.  He was also explaining to me the situation and what happened to make him upset.

                I was shocked that he had thought of this idea to help him cope with and explain things.  When he was done, he looked at me and said, “That was better mom.  Now I feel better.”  This is something that we will be using in the future to help him explain situations and his feelings involved.

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Writing out the Situation

                Once kids are older, they may want to write out what happened- especially if they are gifted at writing.  A sixth grader I work with tried this the last two times he got upset at school.

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                While he was writing the situation out on the computer, he was able to go back and add details and take out things as he saw fit.  Because he tends to talk quickly and think faster than he talk, this gave him the opportunity to explain the whole story without forgetting things, and he was able to take his time thinking about the situation and how he was feeling in each moment.  Once completed, he was able to share the document with the different people he needed to explain things to, which eliminated the frustration of verbally sharing the story five times over.

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Final Thoughts

                Now, these ideas do not take away the importance of having them verbally process the situation.  We still do that, but it allows them to process in the way they are gifted at processing things without getting more upset.  Appropriate consequences are still given, but the child is allowed to explain things his/her own way.

                I also wait until the child has calmed down enough to do the picture or writing.  For example, I cuddled with my son for ten minutes and my student rocked in the rocking chair and spent time alone with quiet music and a book in a calm room before processing the situation.

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                Will this work every time?  Possibly not.  Part of the trick is teaching them how to do this before an incident happens.  My son’s therapist has been having him draw something about his week each session and my student has been writing about things that have happened in the past.  So they had been essentially practicing for this situation and felt comfortable doing it.  The fine motor skills activity was also helpful in helping them calm down and reduce the anxiety level.

                Certainly there are many other ideas and thoughts for processing after a meltdown.  And of course this can work for kids that are not on the spectrum as well.  Share with me your thoughts and things that work for your children!  Practice these skills with your kids so they can implement them to help them process!

Autism in the New School Year

Autism in the New School Year

A friend of mine recently told me, “You said August and September were going to be difficult months; you were right.” The new school year is always a challenge for kids on the Spectrum. New schools, new teachers, new rules, new classmates, new schedules and routines. Generally it takes 6-8 weeks for kids to acclimate to the new year and feel settled.

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How Can I Make This Better?

Try to predict how your child is going to react to certain things; plan ahead. For example, if I know my son is having a change in his school schedule (such as an assembly), I need to explain the day before and the morning of to remind him and answer any questions. One nice thing about Autism is it is generally predictable once you know and understand your child. We are able to predict how our son will handle certain things and can then prepare accordingly.

Now certainly we are not always 100% accurate, and often he surprises us with handling things well, or on occasion not well. But being prepared and thinking ahead has made our lives SOO much easier.

Keep in Communication

Talk often to your child’s teachers and workers. I probably email my son’s Special Education team at least 3 times a week. I email his teacher a couple times a week. I want to know what is going on and how things are going for him. I am proactive in following through with his behavior at school and finding links to problems.

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Talk often to any therapists your child has, especially right before a session so they know what is going on and how to work with them.

And of course, talk with your kiddo! Find out what is bothering them. Ask them how YOU can help them. Talk about your expectations. Be supportive of your child and communicate daily your love!

The Challenging Behavior- DAILY!

Like I always say, keep calm. Fight the battles that are worth fighting. You will need to find the balance between what is worth focusing on and what behaviors you can ignore. This is not easy and often stressful. On the one hand, you do not want your child getting away with everything, but you want some peace in your home as well.

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Try to find the links between the challenging behaviors. Many times there are no links to be found; sometimes you find links in the most peculiar places! Use a lot of positive rewards. For example, when my son comes home with no sad faces on his behavior chart, he will get a “good boy treat” and often Mommy partakes in a “good mommy treat” too!

Use any close family and friends to help you! Find someone you can safely “vent” to and avoid venting in front of your child. We all need to be able to talk openly at times about our struggles. If you do not have that safe person, I encourage you to find someone quickly! You might want to have someone that you can talk with on the phone or face-to-face versus texting/email, etc. Pastors, social workers, and counselors are some examples of safe people if you do not have family or friends.

Final Thoughts

Hang in there! Hopefully by the holidays your child is more calm and confident in his/her situation. Then they get the nice holiday break and have to start all over again come January!

Use picture schedules or written schedules when necessary and helpful. Find other tools that will help your child succeed.

Remember, you are called to be parents/workers with this beautiful child, and you will become qualified!

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